Announcements

October 29, 2019: Check out recent author Adrain Chastain Weimer’s blogpost!

Adrian Chastain Weimer writes for the Massachusetts Historical Society blog on “Elijah’s Mantle & its Annotations: A Source for Puritan Constitutionalism” Check out the blog here.

Weimer’s related article, “The Resistance Petitions of 1664–1665: Confronting the Restoration in Massachusetts Bay,” appears in the June 2019 issue of the New England Quarterly.

Read Weimer’s NEQ article here, free for the next two months!

February 28, 2019: The Colonial Society of Massachusetts Announces the 2019 Walter Muir Whitehill Prize in Early American History

This prize of two thousand five hundred dollars, established in memory of Walter Muir Whitehill, for many years Editor of Publications for the Colonial Society and the moving force behind the organization, will be awarded for a distinguished essay on early American history (up to 1825), not previously published, with preference being given to New England subjects. The Society hopes that the prize may be awarded annually.

A committee of eminent historians will review the essays. Their decision in all cases will be final.

By arrangement with the editors of The New England Quarterly, the Society will have the winning essay published in an appropriate issue of the journal.

Essays are now being accepted for consideration. All manuscripts submitted for the 2019 prize must be postmarked no later than December 31, 2019. The Society expects to announce the winning candidate in the spring of 2020.

Entries submitted for consideration should be addressed to:

Whitehill Prize Committee
c/o The New England Quarterly

Department of History
University of Massachusetts, Boston
100 Morrissey Blvd.
Boston, MA 02125

Click here for more information including judging criteria, submission specifications, and past winners.

December 10, 2018: New Section of NEQ Website: Innovations in Teaching

The New England Quarterly is pleased to announce the addition of Innovations in Teaching to our website. Grateful for the contribution of Professor Gustafson’s class, we solicit responses to continue the conversation we hope this essay initiates on teaching. We also welcome comments, suggestions, and contributions that would facilitate other conversations on the teaching of history. Our only guidance at this point is that all contributions be directed towards advancing New England history and literary culture and being of use to teachers. Those interested in contributing a pedagogical exercise or commentary should forward pdf and word documents to neq@umb.edu for the editors’ review.