The New England Quarterly

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Our September 2017 issue is now available.

“The New England Quarterly is pleased to present the winning essay of the 2016 Walter Muir Whitehill Prize for Early American History, ‘The Bishop Controversy, the Imperial Crisis, and Religious Radicalism in New England, 1763-74′ by Peter W. Walker. Like all good scholarship, Walker expertly builds upon the growing body of scholarship on the Revolution that reflects a more complicated, differentiated empire. Described by the Whitehill Prize Committee as a ‘sober-sided, coherent argument sustained by strong research in archival sources; well-written to boot,’ Walker’s essay on the New England Anglican bishop controversy stands Carl Bridenbaugh’s interpretation, in the words of one of the prize judges, ‘on its head and makes it comprehensible and significant.’”  Scroll down to see a list of this issue’s articles. Click here to see the full table of contents.

The Colonial Society of Massachusetts announces the 2016 Walter Muir Whitehill Prize winner, Peter W. Walker.

The award-winning essay, “The Bishop Controversy, the Imperial Crisis, and Religious Radicalism in New England, 1763-74” is featured in the September 2017 issue of The Quarterly.

The NEQ is accepting submissions for the 2017 Whitehill Prize in Early American History. Click here for more information including judging criteria, submission specifications, and past winners.


—  Volume 90, Issue 3: September 2017  —

Editorial
by Jonathan M. Chu — read for free

The Bishop Controversy, the Imperial Crisis, and Religious Radicalism in New England, 1763-74: By arrangement with the Colonial Society of Massachusetts the Editors of the New England Quarterly are pleased to publish the winning essay of the 2016 Walter Muir Whitehill Prize in Early American History
by Peter W. Walker — read for free

A Loyalist Who Loved His Country too Much: Thomas Hutchinson, Historian of Colonial Massachusetts
by Liam Riordan

Connecticut Confronts the Guillotine: The French Revolution and the Land of Steady Habits
by Robert J. Imholt

Indians and Antiquity: Subversive Classicism in Early New England Poetry
by Joanne van der Woude

“Always as a Means, Never as an End”: Orestes Brownson’s “Transcendentalist” Criticism and the Uses of the Literary
by Tim Sommer

Book Reviews

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“Each generation must rewrite history from its own point of view.” 
NEQ’s Founding Editors, 1928